IN THE BAZAARS OF HYDERABAD BY SAROJINI NAIDU PDF

Add to list. Richly your wares are displayed. Turbans of crimson and silver, Tunics of purple brocade, Mirrors with panels of amber, Daggers with handles of jade. What do you weigh, O ye vendors? Saffron and lentil and rice. What do you grind, O ye maidens?

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To understand the context for writing this poem, you first need to know that Sarojini Naidu was a major political figure in the Indian freedom movement in the first half of the 20th century. And as for the context , the poem was written as a part of the Swadeshi Movement.

During that freedom movement the Indians decided to boycott European merchandise and use the Indian products instead. So, she goes on to give a picture of a bazaar where traditional Indian products are ruling. The poem is in the form of questions and answers. Through this technique she make the picture of the bazaar visible to us.

The poem contains five stanzas of six lines each. It follows a unique rhyme scheme where the second, fourth and sixth lines in each stanza are rhyming. The third and fifth lines are also rhyming.

The last stanza is a slight exception though. What do you sell O ye merchants? Richly your wares are displayed. Turbans of crimson and silver, Tunics of Purple brocade, Mirrors with panels of Amber, Daggers with handles of jade. What do you weigh, O ye vendors? Saffron and lentil and rice. What do you grind, O ye maidens? Sandalwood, henna, and spice.

What do you call, O ye pedlars? Chessmen and ivory dice. The poet then visits the vendors, the maidens and the pedlars salesmen. She asks the vendors what they are weighing for sale. The vendors reply that they are weighing saffron, lentil and rice.

The poet then asks the maiden girls what they are grinding. And now the pedlars are asked what they are calling as their trade cry. They say that they are selling chessmen and dice made from ivory for the game of chess. What do you make, O ye goldsmiths? The poet now goes up to the goldsmiths and asks them what they are making.

And the bells are as thin and lightweight as the wings of a dragonfly. What do you cry, O ye, fruitmen? Citron, pomegranate, and plum. What do you play, O musicians? Sitar, sarangi and drum. What do you chant, O magicians? Spells for aeons to come. The poet in the poem In The Bazaars of Hyderabad now asks the fruit sellers what fruits are they selling.

They answer that there are citron, pomegranate and plum. Now as the poet asks the musicians what instruments they are play, they reply that they are playing on sitar, sarangi and drum. After that poet goes to the magicians and asks them what they are chanting. The reply comes,he is chanting the spells to bring in aeons a divine power who would help him perform his magical tricks.

What do you weave, O ye flower-girls? With tassels of azure and red? Crowns for the brow of a bridegroom, Chaplets to garland his bed. Sheets of white blossoms, new-garnered To perfume the sleep of the dead.

In the last stanza of the poem the poet asks the flower girls what they are weaving with the azure deep blue and red tassels strands of flower.

Thus the poet Sarojini Naidu represents an Indian market to give us a sense of the rich Indian heritage. This poem was her protest against the European products and an appreciation of our own goods. Necessary cookies are absolutely essential for the website to function properly.

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It is mandatory to procure user consent prior to running these cookies on your website. Also Read: Solved Questions on this poem. Sharing is caring! This website uses cookies for analytics, ads and to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Close Privacy Overview This website uses cookies to improve your experience while you navigate through the website. Out of these cookies, the cookies that are categorized as necessary are stored on your browser as they are essential for the working of basic functionalities of the website.

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In the Bazaars of Hyderabad by Sarojini Naidu — Explanation

To understand the context for writing this poem, you first need to know that Sarojini Naidu was a major political figure in the Indian freedom movement in the first half of the 20th century. And as for the context , the poem was written as a part of the Swadeshi Movement. During that freedom movement the Indians decided to boycott European merchandise and use the Indian products instead. So, she goes on to give a picture of a bazaar where traditional Indian products are ruling.

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In The Bazaars of Hyderabad by Sarojini Naidu

Back to: Sarojini Naidu Poems. Most of her poems reflect the nationalistic feelings and this poem is no exception to it. She hails from Hyderabad and this poem is in the praise of the city, its beauty and the richness. The poem is in the form of questions asked by the poet and answers given by the vendors. The poem is divided into 5 stanzas having 6 lines each. The rhyme scheme of the poem is abcbcb.

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In The Bazaars of Hyderabad –Sarojini Naidu: Summary

Born with Bengali roots to an intellectually-gifted parents, Sarojini Naidu had the opportunity to receive good education both in India and in England. She made the best of her extraordinary talent and privileged upbringing to do things that her soul really craved for. The plight of Indian women made her very sad. Crushed under the weight of blind tradition and marginalized in a patriarchal society, women had no window to breathe free let alone engage in any meaningful intellectual activity. Sarojini Naidu took up the cudgels on their behalf and crusaded for their emancipation.

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